A new pro-social media video

These “revolutionary” videos are always fun — seems like everyone makes them these days.

This one is a little over-the-top for my taste (some of the statistics are taken out of context) and it’s clearly a calling card for the author of Socialnomics. But it’s still well-done and contains lots of little tidbits to get you thinking. Enjoy!

2 thoughts on “A new pro-social media video

    • Interesting. Michael Rosenblum recently talked about how several eastern European Jews came to America early in the 20th century, migrated to Hollywood and then became major film moguls. And the movies they produced relentlessly celebrated the idea of America — the promise, the shining city on a hill, the potential and the goodness — and beamed that message into movie houses across the country. Their movies telegraphed a fairly unrealistic notion of America right into the psyche of Americans. But those ideas stuck and shaped our nation’s sense of identity and purpose in the world. Gritty reality wasn’t part of the image.

      So this notion of “mimetic beliefs” you bring up rings true. What we say about social media is perhaps more important than reality, more important than facts. Web 2.0 is whatever you want it to be — a waste of time and a savior of humanity all in one!

      It reminds me of what I told someone recently about Sarah Palin. She’s what you want her to be; she’s what you want to see in her — she’s been successful because she’s a blank slate or a vessel into which people pour all their hopes, dreams and fears. She doesn’t really stand for much in reality because her grip on reality is limited and fantastical, not fact- or knowledge-based. But she’s a stand-in for whatever some people think is wrong with the world, fighting the “good fight” for “good people.” Really, it’s all nonsense. But not if you believe.

      I would hope when we profile projects in social media we’re not so swept up in this kind of self-serving analysis too much. Some self-serving is necessary to keep things moving and developing. But at some point we’ll need to step back and ask whether we’re following a digital Sarah Palin and we’re not really going anywhere.

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